Carebnb and the law of unintended consequences

Carebnb and the law of unintended consequences

Along with the title: “NHS may rent spare rooms to ease bed crisis” The Guardian ran a story this week, on what it describes as an Airbnb style scheme designed to help alleviate pressure in the NHS, by enabling patients ready to be discharged from hospital to recuperate in a private home. The story, which was first featured in the Health Service Journal, was also covered by Roy Lilley in his regular blog where he raises a host of concerns about CareRooms including safeguarding, exploitation, safety, training and regulation. However, beyond the obvious concerns, he asks the more fundamental and interesting question: “The real issue is not if CareRooms can be made to work safely.  The real issue is why are we even contemplating this? … Austerity is the mother of innovation and here is an innovative solution driven by the mother of all austerity.” On its website, CareRooms offers hosts £50 per room per night, and the promise of up to £1000 a month, for providing a bedroom and three supplied microwave meals for a discharged patient. The website incorporates pictures of hotel style immaculate bedrooms along with a reassuring narrative: “We are working with the local health and care community to provide a safe, comfortable place for people to recuperate from hospital.” Co-founded by a doctor, CareRooms was conceived out of real struggles with shortages in social care, and makes a compelling case to solve what is a well-reported strain on the NHS. It has the support of the NHS clinical entrepreneur programme and I have no doubt it is positively intended. So if the concerns raised...
The gap between hyperbole and reality in digital health

The gap between hyperbole and reality in digital health

Looking back at what the mHabitat team have been up to in 2016, I am convinced more than ever that the gap between the hyperbole of digital health and reality in practice remains a yawning chasm. There have been moments in the year when I’ve been quite taken aback by the distance we have yet to travel in utilising even the most basic and ubiquitous of technologies to improve healthcare. Here are three  stories that have stuck in my mind from our co-design work during 2016 to give a sense of what I mean. They aren’t heroic stories of great leadership and transformative change, but rather everyday stories of things not working quite right, and that’s sort of the point. Doing the simple things well (or not) It was during a co-design workshop with a health service that young people described how they value the text messaging reminder service. A good example whereby a ubiquitous technology is used to keep in touch and a solid foundation to build on. However participants were dismayed when a member of staff brought down the box with the office non-smartphone that is brought out daily to send each message individually with each number punched in for every single message that is sent. The staff explained how, to save time, they type the message in one of their (personal) smartphones and then text it to the device and then forward it onto their recipients. They went on to demonstrate how the phone will only hold 50 messages so they have to wipe them each time they want to send out a new set of...

What has frugal innovation got to offer the NHS, social care and wider public sector? This is a question we will be debating at our People Drive Digital #PDDigital16 festival on the evening of 28 November at the Open Data Institute in Leeds. One of our debaters is Jaideep Prabhu who is professor of Indian Business and Enterprise at the Cambridge Judge Business School within the University of Cambridge. Jaideep has written extensively on the topic of frugal innovation both in emerging markets and in the Western world. You can watch him share his thoughts about what the West can learn from frugal innovation here: So what is frugal innovation and how is it relevant to people driving digital innovation in health and care? Nesta define frugal innovation as follows: Frugal innovation responds to limitations in resources, whether financial, material or institutional, and using a range of methods, turns these constraints into an advantage. You can read a Nesta report on frugal innovation here. The report highlights many examples of frugal innovation and I particularly liked the story of the Kerala neighbourhood network in palliative care. In contrast to a doctor led hierarchical model of care, volunteers from the local community are trained to identify problems of people who chronically ill in their area and to intervene. 70 percent of the Kerala population have access to palliative care in contrast to only 1 percent at a national level. The neighbourhood network consists of more than 4,000 volunteers, with 36 doctors and 60 nurses providing expert support and advice to enable care for 5000 patients at any one time. Frugal...
How can directors of informatics support people driven digital? #NYHDFpeople

How can directors of informatics support people driven digital? #NYHDFpeople

How can NHS directors of informatics support and enable people driven digital innovation? This is a question Sue Sibbald and I will be speaking to when we present to the Northern, Yorkshire and Humberside Directors of Informatics Forum this Friday. In our work at mHabitat we have found the top five practical barriers to digital innovation that fall within the domain of informatics directors are: Staff equipped with mobile devices Sufficient bandwidth to access the web Public wifi in all health and care settings A permissive approach to social media (not blocking channels such as YouTube) Access to online patient held records and interoperability with third party apps. The other big barrier we have found is the variable confidence of health and care staff to make use of digital tools and the Internet in their day to day front line work and professional development – the above list will provide the right backdrop but culture and confidence is mostly an organisational development issue. Here is our draft presentation which features feedback from #PdDigital15: Sue and I are keen to crowdsource your priorities for directors of informatics in enabling people driven digital. Whether you’re someone who accesses health and care services, a practitioner, or simply someone with an interest in the topic, we’d love to hear your views. Please comment on this blog or tweet us using the hashtag #NYHDIFpeople. We’ll adapt our presentation to incorporate your feedback...
Digital technologies in mental health – opportunities, challenges and unexpected benefits

Digital technologies in mental health – opportunities, challenges and unexpected benefits

In a few weeks time I am speaking at the 2nd Summit New Technologies and Mental Health: Future Possibilities in Barcelona. In my presentation I will share opportunities, challenges and unexpected benefits arising from the first year and a half of our mHabitat programme – supporting digital innovation in the sphere of mental health and beyond. People first – technology second The first insight I will share is a simple one – the fundamental importance of putting people first and technology second. It seems obvious that people should be at the heart of any innovation in mental health, but we have learnt that it is often missed. It is too easy for the allure of new technology to outshine more mundane but crucial considerations of understanding what people actually want and need. Why is it so important to put people first? Creating or licensing a digital technology will only add real value if we deeply understand the preferences, motivations and capabilities of the people they are intended for. Fortunately there are established methodologies, such as user centred design and service design for co-designing digital technologies that add value to a user’s journey through a service. In the health service there is the added dimension that digital technologies need to be underpinned by sound theories of behaviour change and/or clinical guidance as well as meeting regulatory requirements. Generating evidence so we know what works and what doesn’t is also an important consideration. Putting people at the centre is the first step to developing digital technologies that will really make a difference to people’s lives. Putting people first means recognising that...