Mental Health Awareness week #BeBodyKind – thoughts for mental health practitioners and digital innovators

Mental Health Awareness week #BeBodyKind – thoughts for mental health practitioners and digital innovators

I recently wrote an opinion piece for mobile health news for Mental Health Awareness week. Here is the full post on their site, which I have reproduced below: Hosted by the Mental Health Foundation (MHF), Mental Health Awareness Week takes place from 13 until 19 May and the theme this year is body image – how we think and feel about our bodies, based on research undertaken by the foundation. The MHF research shows that just over one in five adults (22%) and 40% of teenagers worry about their body image as a result of social media. Another piece of research by the Be Real campaign finds that almost two-thirds of young people (61%) feel pressure to look their best online and more than two thirds (67%) regularly worry about the way they look. MHF make a number of recommendations for regulators, industry, public health and education. But what does this mean for mental health practitioners and digital mental health innovators interested in helping young people? In Teen mental health in an online world, along with a colleague, I explored teenagers’ use of social media and the impact on body image, amongst other adverse effects. Whilst the association between negative body image and idealised images online is clear, the ways in which young people actively resist these stereotypes is often underestimated in research and campaigns. Through our interviews and focus groups, we found examples of young people being anything other than passive consumers as they navigate their on/ offline lives. In one focus group, we stumbled across the #iamperfectasme social media campaign which was established by a group of BAME young women in Bradford, who set out to promote body confidence...
100% digital – shining a light on digital health and care in Leeds #LDF19

100% digital – shining a light on digital health and care in Leeds #LDF19

Each spring, the Leeds Digital Festival corrals the digital community to put on its Sunday best and parade our northern finery to the world. With a thriving digital health and care sector in the city, we are super proud at mHabitat to curate this theme of the festival on behalf of the NHS and local authority, in partnership with a whole range of local and national bodies. You can find our programme of events here. Digital and the inverse care law With technology woven throughout the NHS Long Term Plan there has never been more of a focus on the role of digital in enabling transformation of health and care services. However, in stark contrast, barely a day goes by where we don’t encounter the most basic barriers to uptake of  technology, not only in services but in people’s everyday lives. Whether it be community nurses whose laptops either take forever to boot up, or young people in excluded communities confused about how to navigate the web, we need to think critically about both infrastructure and human factors. If we fail to do this then we run the risk of exacerbating the inverse care law and worsening health inequalities. One way to understand how we balance the promise of digital technology with the realities of health and care services, and the lived experience of patients and citizens, is to bring people together from a wide range of disciplines to deliberate. Our events endeavour to blend a variety of perspectives and expertise – academics with clinicians; citizens with philosophers, ethicists with industry – and so on. Our 100% Digital Leeds...
What really counts – keeping humanity at the heart of digital innovation

What really counts – keeping humanity at the heart of digital innovation

Digital innovation is going to save the NHS. We use digital in every other aspect of our lives so why not the NHS? So the hyperbole and the mantra goes. But what if, in our fetishisation of digital, we get too focused on shiny products and forget what really counts? This moving blog post by health economist Dr Chris Gibbons about his family’s interactions with health services, when his dad was very ill, made me pause and reflect on how we keep values of humanity at the heart of efforts to innovate and improve health services. Here is a section of the blog post which emphasises that it was person-centred  and goal-orientated care that made the biggest difference to Chris’ dad: “Innovation has many guises. Innovative ways of thinking about the hospital system. From the point of admission to the successful discharge and rehabilitation of people in a place of their preference then linking up that system seamlessly with health and social care system. We need to emphasise the importance that people doing Neil’s [care worker] job have in linking that all together as a person centred, goal oriented approach to recovery and rehabilitation. That’s where the real value in innovation sits. It doesn’t fit neatly into a Markov model, or have fancy branding and the backing of a pharma company that’ll send you to Honolulu for a conference. But it is the kind of innovation that we should be judging against all the other “innovations” that do” How do we assess what really counts and what is going to make the biggest difference to patients when we have...
Frameworks, lyrics and non-adoption of technology

Frameworks, lyrics and non-adoption of technology

You know that feeling when a piece of music (or a book or film) resonates so strongly that it helps you understand something about your life? In my late teens it was The Smiths who did just that. I suspect that teenage hormones may have been a factor, but every lyric from Morrissey’s pen seemed to speak to me directly. Fast forward to 2018, and minus the heady mix of adolescent intensity and the tunes, I had a not altogether dissimilar sensation reading Beyond Adoption: A New Framework for Theorizing and Evaluating Nonadoption, Abandonment, and Challenges to the Scale-Up, Spread, and Sustainability of Health and Care Technologies by Trisha Greenhalgh et al (2017). This paper felt like reliving the first four years of my journey into the digital health technology sphere – every challenge, mistake, obstacle we have encountered is captured in this compelling paper on why technology doesn’t get adopted in the NHS. It felt a bit like the life story of mHabitat but minus the highs… NASSS is an evidence based and theory informed framework that endeavours to set out the interrelated factors that influence the non-adoption abandonment, scale-up, spread or sustainability of technology. It aims to be a tool that can easily be used in practice. The rich blend of research methods comprising case studies with qualitative interviews and ethnography, along with a review of the literature, elicited the seven framework themes (see the diagram above). Our tacit experience of non-adoption could have easily have been one of these case studies – everything from poor clarity of the problem the technology is meant to solve; poor...
Convenient access to your GP – what’s not to like?

Convenient access to your GP – what’s not to like?

General Practice is in crisis. A record number of GP practices closed last year as a result of growing patient demand without the requisite funding and workforce to respond. So a new app-based service for Londoners, which offers information services and video based consultations must be a good thing – right? The launch of GP at hand, which promises that you can see a GP in minutes for free, has been widely covered in the press. Whilst it has its fair share of promoters, they are some notable detractors. The purpose of this post is to curate those concerns and to consider implications for the future of digital in the NHS. What is GP at hand? GP at hand is a new NHS service offered by a GP Practice in partnership with the commercial company Babylon. The practice offers registered patients the ability to book an appointment via the app, have a video consultation via the app 24/7 and within two hours, pick up a prescription from their chosen pharmacist, visit one of six clinics in London Monday to Saturday. The app, which is powered by Babylon, also offers a symptom checker, health monitoring, and the option to replay your appointment so you can remind yourself of what was discussed. The app offers convenience, quick access and the ability to speak to a GP anytime and anywhere. A quick reminder about how General Practice works General Practices offer primary care services to a local community. On their website, NHS England say they are ‘at the heart of our communities, the foundation of the NHS.’ Most GPs are independent contractors...